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 Ahemedaltayb, AbdalhafizAbdalhafiz Ahemedaltayb (UMES, M.S.)
Marine, Estuarine and Environmental Science 
Bio: 
Hafiz completed his B.Sc. degree in chemistry and botany from University of Khartoum (Sudan). In 2012, he enrolled in UMES's graduate program in toxicology. Prior to enrolling at UMES , Hafiz worked at the Sudanese Standard and Metrology Organization in Sudan. Currently his research is focused on the detection and quantification of trace metals and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) and trybutyltin (TBT) in blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus), water and sediments in the Maryland Coastal Bays and its many dead end canals under the supervision of Drs. Paulinus Chigbu and Dia-Elnaim.

Laura Almodóvar-Acevedo (UMES, Ph.D.)
Marine, Estuarine and Environmental Science 
Bio: 
Laura Almodóvar-Acevedo received a bachelor’s degree in Biology from the University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus. She’s currently a Ph.D. student at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and is specializing in Ecology as part of the Marine-Estuarine-Environmental Science program. Her research focuses on black sea bass dynamics in the Chesapeake Bay. Under the advisement of Dr. Brad Stevens and Dr. Howard Townsend, she is working on a habitat suitability model to investigate if the historical decline in black sea bass landings is associated with a decrease in available habitat. The ultimate goal of their work is to develop an Estuarine Habitat Affinity Index that can be incorporated into a stock assessment model to explain some variability in black sea bass juvenile recruitment.
Jessica AndradeJessica Andrade (OSU, M.S.)
Fisheries Science

Bio:  Jessica graduated from the University of San Diego (USD) with a B.A. in marine science and an emphasis in biology.  At USD she gained research experience as a Ronald E. McNair Post-baccalaureate Achievement Program Scholar examining California killifish growth using otoliths.  Currently, Jessica is a first year Master's student and she and her advisors are developing a research project that aims to determine how ocean acidification affects northern rock sole behavior.
Tedra2Tedra Booker (UMES, Ph.D.)
Marine, Estuarine and Environmental Science
Bio: 
Tedra received her B.S. in Chemistry and a minor in mathematics from Lincoln University in Lincoln, Pennsylvania. After graduation she attended the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and obtained her M.S. in Marine-Estuarine-Environmental Science with an area of specialization in Environmental Chemistry. Currently enrolled in the Ph.D. program here at UMES, Tedra’s research focuses on how exposure to environmental estrogens during critical life stages affects the prevalence of intersex characteristics in striped bass and yellow perch in Chesapeake Bay. In addition, she is examining the possible role of land use in this pattern. Tedra is advised by Dr. Eric May.
S CaballeroSmit Vasquez Caballero (OSU, Ph.D.)
Applied Economics
Bio: 
Smit Vasquez Caballero studied economics at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), and Rural Sociology at the Institute for Sociological Research in Oaxaca, Mexico. He has a B.S. degree in Economics from Southern Oregon University and a M.S. degree in Agricultural and Resource Economics from Oregon State University. Currently, Smit is a Ph.D. student in Applied Economics at Oregon State University. His research is in resource and development economics with a special focus on common property natural resource management and governance. Currently he is working on a bio economic analysis of Pacific salmon stocks and expects to graduate in June 2015. Smit and his wife, Marie Uhtoff,have three children: Lena, Luis and Leo.
Wilmelie Cruz-Marrero (UMES, Ph.D.)
Marine, Estuarine and Environmental Science 
Bio: 
Wilmelie Cruz is currently a graduate student in the UMES MEES program. She is advised by Dr. Bradley Stevens. Her research focus is offshore wind sites, doing a benthic habitat assessment of the Maryland coast using video technology. She completed her bachelor’s degree from University of Puerto Rico, Humacao Campus. As an undergraduate Wilmelie was part of a fellowship with SCDNR working with effects of an invasive species in Charleston, SC. She is interested in fisheries management, invasive species and effects of humans in coastal ecosystems.

 Dan BSBDan Cullen (UMES, Ph.D.)
Marine, Estuarine and Environmental Science
Bio: 
Dan completed his MS degree from UMES in 2010. His thesis research examined the effects of temperature change on the distribution and behavior in monkfish in the northwest Atlantic Ocean. He is continuing his graduate studies at UMES under Dr. Brad Stevens, focusing his research on the population dynamics of black sea bass in the mid-Atlantic utilizing video technology. In his current research, Dan is collaborating with Gary Shepherd from the Population Dynamics Branch at the NOAA Woods Hole lab and Dr. Vince Guida (NOAA J.J. Howard Marine Science Lab) serves on his committee.
ChanteChante Davis (OSU, Ph.D.)
Fisheries Science
Bio: 
Chante is originally from California, where she completed her Bachelors and Masters degrees at CSU Monterey Bay and Moss Landing Marine Laboratories. Her previous research involved understanding the life history of elasmobranchs and focused on reproduction, age and growth of a deep-sea skate. She is currently adding genetic tools to her research repertoire. She is interested in the ecology, genetic diversity and evolution of life history traits and how these factors shape population structure and growth. She is analyzing the functional genetic diversity of Chinook salmon in the Pacific Northwest and will describe how landscape features influence the spatial and temporal distribution of populations..
HillaryHillary Dean (DSU, M.S.)
Bio: 
Hillary Dean is a graduate student at Delaware State University. She received her B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Toledo, where she participated in the NSF Undergraduate Research and Mentoring program under the guidance of Dr. Carol Stepien, Director of the Lake Erie Research Center at the University of Toledo.

LaTreeseLaTreese Denson (OSU, M.S.)
Fisheries Science
Bio:
LaTreese Denson is originally from Queens, New York.SItuated between the Atlantic Ocean and Jamaica Bay, this is where she discovered her interest in marine science. She received her B.S. from North Carolina State University in Biological Oceanography in 2010. When LaTreese was not studying, she was on the NC State Drumline and playing Intermural basketball. During her undergraduate education, she was also a NOAA Hollings Scholar,during which time shehad her first opportunity to conduct and present research.Participating in the NOAA Population Dynamics Workshop and a Marine Science Fellowship at the Duke Marine Laboratory encouraged her to pursue a M.S. Degree in Fisheries Science at Oregon State University under the supervision of Dr. Jessica Miller. Her primary research interests are the dynamics and modeling of aquatic ecosystems. In the future, she plans to pursue a Ph.D. and become a professor.
Rehab3Rehab El Fadul (UMES, Ph.D.)
Marine, Estuarine and Environmental Science
Bio: 
Rehab graduated from Sudan University of Science and Technology (SUST) with a B.S. in Chemistry and received her M.S. degree in Chemistry from UMES before joining LMRCSC in 2009. Co-advised by Dr. Ali Ishaque and Dr. Joseph Okoh, her research focuses on the analysis of Contaminants of Emerging Concerns (CECs) in the Maryland Coastal Bays (MCBs). Specifically, she is using vitellogenin (vtg) as a biomarker for contaminant exposure in summer flounder (Paralichthys dentatus) and spot (Leiostomus xanthurus). She expects to graduate in May of 2013.
EricEEric Evans (UMES, Ph.D.)
Marine, Estuarine and Environmental Science
Bio: 
Eric joined LMRCSC in August, 2009 after completing his Masters degree in Environmental Science from Jackson State University in May. His Masters research examined the effects of hurricane Katrina on the biodiversity of Grand Bay Estuarine Research Reserve using GIS and remote sensing. He has also conducted research on the nutritional status and predation on sea urchins in California and on cyanobacteria in Kaneohe Bay, HI. Eric's current research focuses on the population ecology and dynamics of bay anchovy, an important forage species in the Maryland Coastal Bays.
Publications: Evans, E.D., Anjaneyulu, Y., and P. B. Tchounwou. (2012). Effects of Hurricane Katrina on land cover within the Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve in Mississippi, USA. in K. Vitale (ed). Environmental and food safety and security for Southeast Europe and Ukraine. NATO Science for Peace and Security Series C: Environmental Security, Springer Science. 173-188.

HanifAmmar Hanif (UMCES IMET,Ph.D.)
Marine-Estuarine-Environmental Science
Bio: 
Ammar is a Ph.D. student with the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology. Under the advisory of Drs. Rosemary Jagus and Allen Place, Ammar studies the effects of climate change on Chesapeake Bay food webs by studying the diet and microbiome of the Atlantic Menhaden, a forage fish.

HawthorneNoelle Hawthorne (SSU, M.S.)
Marine Science
Bio: 
Noelle is working on an acoustic tagging project in Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary. The first part of her research is identifying the environmental factors that impact acoustic signaling of the transmitters surgically implanted in fish. She is using arrays of stationary control tags and closely examining their detection patterns along with the changing environmental conditions in Gray's Reef. This information will be used to determine whether or not the movement patterns observed in tagged fish are a result of environmental interference or fish behavior. The second half of her research will be analyzing the fish movement patterns within Gray's Reef. Nicole is advised by Dr. Matthew Ogburn.
Susan Kelly (UMES, P.S.M.) 
Quantitative Fisheries 
Bio: 
Susan entered the Professional Science Masters program, with a focus on Quantitative Fisheries, in 2012. In the course of teaching high school physics, environmental science and science research, she became engaged in marine population research while helping scientists develop educational activities for secondary students. Susan is interested in investigating the impact of climate regime shifts on fisheries, as well as efforts to identify and mitigate changes in abundance and distribution. With these interests in mind, she pursued a summer internship at NOAA Oxford Cooperative Laboratory. Susan is eager to apply her background in education and curriculum writing towards the development of activities that will help communicate contemporary issues in fisheries management. The research experience and scientific methodology incorporated in the Professional Science Masters program will support this effort and complement her Masters in Education from City University of New York and undergraduate degree from Columbia University.
D LazarreDominique Lazarre (RSMAS, Ph.D.)
Marine Biology and Fisheries
Bio: 
Dominique's childhood love for the ocean developed into a desire to help conserve marine resources and protect marine ecosystems. Dominique completed her undergraduate studies at Eckerd College, receiving her B.S. in both Marine Science and Environmental Studies in 2006. After graduation she spent two years coordinating the Eckerd College Search and Rescue (EC-SAR) program and is now working towards her PhD at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS). Dominique's research focus is on an invasive marine species, the Indo-Pacific lionfish, whose presence threatens the normal functionality of reef ecosystems in the Western Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico. To investigate the spatial movements and connectivity between populations of invasive lionfish,she is coupling age and growth studies with biophysical modeling simulations. She is also conducting research to better understand the impact of lionfish on the spiny lobster trap fishery in the Middle Florida Keys. Dominique is advised by Dr. David Die and by Brice Semmens (NOAA NWFSC).
MarisaMarisa Litz (OSU, Ph.D.)
Fisheries Science
Bio: 
Marisa Litz studied anthropology at the University of British Columbia (UBC), and marine science at the University of Maine, Orono (UMaine) and the University of Hawaii, Hilo (UH) before enrolling in graduate school at Oregon State University (OSU). She has a B.A. degree in Anthropology from UBC, a B.S. in Marine Science from UMaine, and a M.S. in Fisheries Science from OSU. Currently, Marisa is a Ph.D. student in Fisheries Science at OSU under Dr. Jessica Miller. Her research is examining the effects of prey quality on juvenile salmon growth, condition, and swimming performance through field, laboratory, and modeling exercises. Currently she is measuring fatty acid and stable isotope uptake rates in juvenile Pacific salmon fed different formulated diets and expects to graduate in June 2015. In her spare time, Marisa loves surfing and spending time with her husband Greg and their two dogs Mac and Gilbert.
Stephanie Martinez-RiveraStephanie Martinez-Rivera (UMES, M.S.)
Marine, Estuarine Environmental Science

Bio:  Stephanie received her B.S. in Coastal Marine Biology in 2012 from the University of Puerto Rico, Humacao Campus.  She joined the LMRCSC in January 2014 under the advisement of Dr. Bradley Stevens.  Her research focuses on reproductive biology and histology of deep-sea red crabs (Chaceon quinquedens).  Stephanie's research interests are in fisheries management, ecology and population dynamics of crustaceans.
 
 Audy PeoplesAudy Peoples (UMES, M.S.)
Marine, Estuarine and Environmental Science
Bio: 
Audy Peoples is currently a graduate student in the UMES MEES program under the advisement of Dr. Maurice Crawford. Audy’s research focuses on the analysis of stranding demographics, contaminants, and population-level health implications in marine mammals from coastal Maryland and the Chesapeake Bay. He received his B.S. in Marine Environmental Science from Elizabeth City State University in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. As an undergraduate, Audy was part of an internship with NOAA, at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, MA, where he conducted research on the feeding ecology of the Gray Seal through stomach content analysis. Audy is interested in marine mammals, ecology, and environmental health. 

 

Nivette Perez-PerezNivette Perez-Perez (DSU, M.S.)
Natural Resources
Bio:  Nivette received her B.S. in Coastal Marine Biology from the University of Puerto Rico at Humacao in 2012.  After graduation she worked for the Caribbean Fisheries Management Council collecting photographic information about parrotfish fisheries in the Caribbean.  Under the advice of Dr. Stacy Smith and Dr. Gulnihal Ozbay, she is pursuing her M.S. in Natural Resources at DSU.  Her research interests include the effects of climate change, especially ocean acidification, on the development of fish and invertebrate larvae.
Jessica PorquezJessica Porquez (OSU, M.S.)
Fisheries Science
Bio:  Jessica is working on her Masters Degree under the guidance of Dr. Jessica Miller at OSU.
Matthew RamirezMatthew Ramirez (OSU, Ph.D.)
Fisheries Science 

Bio:  Matthew received his B.S. in Zoology from Auburn University in 2011.  After graduating he worked for both the Bald Head Island Conservancy in North Carolina and the Conservancy of Southwest Florida where he assisted in monitoring beaches for sea Turtles nesting activity.   Under the direction of Dr. Selina Heppell, Matthew is analyzing variation in sea turtle foraging, ecology, growth and various other life history  parameters, and is investigating potential effects on sea turtle population dynamics. This information may then be used to improve stock assessment models for sea turtles.
Larry Redd Jr.Larry Redd, Jr. (HU, M.S.)
Biology-Environmental Science

Bio: Larry Redd, Jr. received his B.S. in Biology from Norfolk State University in 2006.  He is currently a graduate student at Hampton University.  His current research is in the area of aquaculture in which he is studying the gastric evacuation of juvenile pompano.
JhamylliaRJhamyllia Rice (UMES, Ph.D.)
Marine, Estuarine and Environmental Science
Bio: 
Jhamyllia’s primary interests are in toxicology and pathology as well as distribution and some aspects of histology of marine mammals. Her research focuses on Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) accumulation in Gray Seals and the potential utility of scat as a means of determining exposure. Following graduation, Jhamyllia would like to continue her work on marine mammals as a researcher with NOAA and to eventually enter academia. Jhamyllia is co-advised by Dr. Eric May (UMES) and Dr. Gordon Waring (NOAA NEFSC).
 Chelsea Richardson Chelsea Richardson (UMES, M.S.)
Marine, Estuarine and Environmental Science
Bio:  While taking part in the dual degree program, Chelsea received a B.S. in Biology from Salisbury University along with a B.S. in Environmental Science from UMES. As an undergraduate, she worked as an LMRCSC lab assistant with Dr. Ali Ishaque and his Ph.D. student Rehab El Fadul, where she analyzed contaminants of emerging concern in Maryland Coastal Bays, in addition to using vitellogenin as a biomarker for exposure to estrogenic compounds. Currently, she is in the beginning stages of her master’s research with her advisor Dr. Ishaque, which will focus on the assessment of trophic interactions and dynamics in the Maryland Coastal Bays ecosystem using stable isotopes, fatty acid biomarkers and gut content analysis.

 Jorge RodriguezJorge J. Rodriguez (UMES, Ph.D.)
Marine Estuarine and Environmental Science
Bio:  
Jorge J. Rodriguez received a Bachelor of Science degree in Agronomy from the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus. Prior to entering the Doctor of Philosophy program, he successfully completed a Master of Science degree in Food and Agricultural Sciences in the University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES). Currently he is a Ph.D. student at UMES in the Marine Estuarine Environmental Sciences (MEES) program specializing in Environmental Molecular Biology/Biotechnology. His research focuses in host-pathogen interactions in the blue mussel. Under the advisement of Dr. Anthony K. Nyame and Dr. April Croxton he is investigating the potential role of glycans in host-pathogen interactions. The ultimate goal of their work is to establish molecular markers that can be used to assess the blue mussels susceptibility to infectivity by pathogens and how these markers may be affected by environmental stressors. 

 Cara Schweitzer Cara Schweitzer (UMES, Ph.D. )
Marine Science
Bio: 
Cara received her B.S. in Biology at The University of Missouri – St. Louis. There she researched, behavioral sexual selection in the live breeding fish, poecilia parae, and the electrosensory pathway of the dorsal octavolateral nucleus (DON) within the paddlefish brain. Cara completed a M.S in Biology at Washington University with an emphasis in circadian rhythms in mouse model. Currently, she has joined the MEES-LMRCSC program at UMES where she is researching fish trap impacts on live-bottom rocky coral habitats and black sea bass within the black sea bass fishery under the supervision of Dr. Bradley Stevens.

 

Crystal SCrystal Smith (SSU, M.S.)
Marine Science
Bio: 
The upper millimeters of marine sediments contain microorganisms that secrete extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS) into the surrounding environment.Crystal is conducting a field survey of EPS on Williamson Island, GA and Country Club Creek, GA and the effects of temperature and salinity on EPS. EPS are important to the marine environment because EPS serves as a source of energy for deposit feeders, aids in the motility of diatoms, and buffers cells against changes in pH, salinity, desiccation, and transfer of contaminants.
Jan VJan Vicente (UMCES-IMET, Ph.D.)
Marine, Estuarine and Environmental Science
Bio: 
Jan is a Ph.D. candidate with the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology under the advisory of Dr. Russell Hill. Jan's project focuses on determining the impact of ocean acidification and thermal stress on the process of skeleton biomineralization in marine sponges. He specifically works with two sponge species that are associated with one another and is trying to determine how this association might be an advantage or a disadvantage strategy in the face of climate change. To study this response he measures how quickly sponges take up silica under thermal stress and ocean acidification. Ultimately, he will be targeting gene expression of silicatein (proteins that make spicules) genes to determine if silicious sponges are truly at an advantage over calcifying organisms because of their skeleton mineralogy. 

WardTiffany Ward (SSU, M.S.)
 Marine Science
 Bio: Tiffany Ward joined the Master's program at Savannah State University after receiving her BS in Marine Science from SSU in 2011.She is currently assessing the vertical relief and rugosity of natural and restored oyster reefs in Georgia as well as factors affecting the distribution of intertidal and subtidal oysterreefs.
Justin Wilson (UMES, M.S.)
Fisheries Science
Bio: 
Justin graduated with a B.S. in Biology from Wilberforce University located in Wilberforce, Ohio in May 2012. He joined the LMRCSC in 2013, where he is now a M.S. student in the Marine, Estuarine and Environmental Science program, studying fisheries science. At the University of Maryland Eastern Shore he currently studies in Dr. Brad Stevens' Lab and his research focuses on determining the age estimates of Deep-Sea Red Crab by growth ring analysis, as well as impacts of climate change on growth and age distribution.
   
NOAA LMRCSC
Carver Hall
University of Maryland Eastern Shore
Princess Anne, MD 21853
(410) 651-7970
Leveraged programs:
CREST-Center for the Integrated Study of Coastal Ecosystem Processes and Dynamics
GEOScience Program
Professional Science Master's Degree (PSM)
Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU)
The Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center is supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Award number: NA11SEC4810002