How to Cite Using CSE (Formerly CBE)


  • **UPDATED TO REFLECT CHANGES IN THE NEW EDITION**

    Printable CSE Citation Style (PDF format)

    This guide provides examples of the CSE (Council of Science Editors) citation style as found in Scientific Style and Format: the CSE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers, 7th edition (2006). CSE is used primarily in the Life Sciences.

    References/Cited References Listing

    The “References” or “Cited References” page is a listing of sources used in your paper or report. Each entry includes the following: author, year of publication, title, and publishing data. Entries are not indented in any way.

    Books

    Book documentation may contain some or all of the following elements: Author(s) or Editor(s), Date of publication, Chapter Title, Book title, Publication Information, and Number of Pages. Do not put commas between the last name and initials or periods after the initials of an author’s name, except for the final period at the end of the author list. Only the first word and proper names are capitalized in titles.

    There are two different ways to organize your reference list. You should check with your professor to determine which is most appropriate.

    1. Citation-Sequence System—The entries are numbered in the order in which they appear in the text. In this system, the year of publication is placed after the name of the journal in the citation or in the case of a book, after the publisher information.

    2. Name-Year System—The entries are listed in alphabetical order by last name of author (or organization name or if no author present, the title of the work). In this system, the year of publication is placed after the last author’s name. The entries are not numbered.

    This handout will show the Citation-Sequence System. See the Scientific Style and Format: the CSE Manual for Authors, Editors, and Publishers for the Name-Year System.

    Single Author

    Li TS. Medicinal plants: culture, utilization, and phytopharmacology. Lancaster (PA): Technomic. 2000. 517p.

    Two to Ten Authors

    Invert all authors’ last names and initials. Complete the entry as for any other book or journal.

    Rosenstein BJ, Fosarelli PD, Baker MD. Pediatric pearls: the handbook of practical pediatrics. 4th ed. St. Louis: Mosby. 2002. 464 p.

    More than Ten Authors

    List the first ten authors, last names and initials, followed by “et al.”

    Editor

    Halevy AH, editor. CRC handbook of flowering. Volume VI. Boca Raton (FL): CRC Press. 1989. 753 p.

    Book Chapter

    Thenius E. The evolution of the Crustacea. In: Grzimek B, editor. Grzimek’s animal life encyclopedia. Volume 1: lower animals. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold. 1974. p 433-5.

    Society, Institution, or Association as author

    Organizational author names are preceded by an abbreviation in square brackets to simplify the in-text citation. [ACS] American Chemical Society. Cleaning our environment, the chemical basis for action; a report. Washington: American Chemical Society. 1969. 249 p.

    Journal Articles

    Article documentation may contain any or all of the following elements: Author(s), Date of Publication, Article Title, Periodical Title, and Publication Information. Authors’ names are treated the same way as with books. Only the first word and proper names are capitalized in article titles.

    Follow the Citation-Sequence System for citing a journal article, magazine or newspaper.

    Rules for journal titles:

    1.  Single word journal titles should be spelled out.

    2. Abbreviate and capitalize significant words in a journal title and omit other words, such as articles, conjunctions, and

    prepositions. For example: of, the, at, and in.

    • The Journal of Biocommunication becomes J Biocommun.

    3. Do not include journal subtitles as part of the abbreviated title

    • JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association becomes JAMA.

    Articles in Print

    Scholarly Journal

    Benhaim D, Skulason S, Hansen BR. Behavioural variation in juvenile Arctic charr in relation to body size. J Fish Biol 2003; 62(6): 1326-1338.

    Magazine article

    If a magazine has volume and issue number, format the reference as for a scholarly journal; otherwise include the date.

    Referenced with volume and issue number:

    Wright, K. Watery grave. Discover 2003; 24(10): 52-55.

    Referenced with date:

    Carey J. 2003 Oct 20. Putting carbon dioxide in its place. Business Week 2003 Oct 20: 82-83.

    Daily Newspaper Article

    With Author:

    Eckbald, M. U.S. News: surge in loans unlikely from small-business plan. Wall Street Journal (Eastern Edition). 2010 Jan 29; Sect. A.4.

    No Author:

    Unlocking the grid. Wall Street Journal (Eastern Edition). 2003 Aug 22; Sect. A:8.

    Internet/Electronic Texts

    References for electronic and Internet sources are similar to print sources with the addition of a format reference [Internet, etc], availability information, and the date accessed. There is no period after the URL. The following are based on the NLM format for Internet references (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bookshelf/br.fcgi?book=citmed), the recommended reference in the CSE Manual.

    Article in an Internet-Only Journal

    Hopkins WG. Dimensions of research. Sportscience [Internet]; 2002 Oct [updated 2002 Nov 11, cited 2003 Oct 23]; 6. Available from http://www.sportsci.org/jour/0201/wghdim.htm

    Online Database—article found in a database the library owns

    Khwaja A. The role of Janus kinases in haemoposesis and haematological malignancy. Br J Haem 2006 Aug; 134 (4):366-384. In Academic Search Premier [Internet]. Birmingham (AL): EBSCO Industries; [cited 2010 Jan 26]; Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=21589320&site=ehost-live; Accession No: 21589320.

    Electronic Book (E-Book)

    Baron A, Getz K, Litwin P. Access cookbook [monograph on the internet]. Boston (MA): Safari Tech Books (O’Reilly); 2002 [cited 2003 Oct 23]. 718 p. Available from http://proquest.safaribooksonline.com/0596000847

    Web page

    With Author:

    Flockhart DA. Drug Interactions: Cytochrome P450 Drug Interaction Table [Internet]. [Indianapolis (IN)]: Indiana University School of Medicine (2007) [revised 2009 Aug 19; cited 2010 Jan 31]. Available from: http://medicine.iupui.edu/clinpharm/ddis/table.asp

    With no author:

    Frederick Douglass National Historic Site [Internet]. Washington: National Park Service (US); [updated 2010 Jan 26; cited 2010 Jan 28]. Available from: http://www.nps.gov/frdo/index.htm

    Daily Newspaper Article Retrieved on the Internet

    Pianin E, Sawyer K. Space station mission opposed: despite safety concerns of some experts, NASA decided to send new crew. Washington Post [Internet]. 2003 Oct 23 [cited 2003 Oct 23]. Sect A:01. Available from http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A3215-2003Oct22.html

    Listserv entry

    Listman D.A. C-spine imaging in trauma patients. In: PED-EM-L-Listserv [discussion list on the Internet]. Providence [RI]: Brown University; 2010 Jan 10 [cited 2010 Jan 30]. [about 1 screen].

    Blog entry

    Lunde, A. You can make a difference in Alzheimer’s diagnosis, services. Alzheimer’s Blog [Internet]. Rochester [MN]: MayoClinic.com. 2010 Jan 30 [cited 2010 Jan 31]. Available from: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/alzheimersdiagnosis/MY01171

    In-text Citations

    There are two different ways to organize your in-text citations which is reflected in the way the list is generated. Youshould check with your professor to determine which is most appropriate.

    1. Citation-Sequence System—The entries are numbered in the order in which they appear in the text. In this system, the year of publication is placed after the name of the journal in the citation or in the case of a book, after the publisher information.

    2. Name-Year System—The entries are listed in alphabetical order by last name of author (or organization name or if no author present, the title of the work). In this system, the year of publication is placed after the last author’s name. The entries are not numbered.

    In-text citations direct the reader to a specific page in a book, journal, magazine, or other source. They provide the exact source of a quote without breaking the chain of thought in your paper. They increase the validity of your work, by informing the reader of sources you have drawn upon whether you are paraphrasing or including a direct quote.

    Citation-Sequence System

    1. A single citation.

    The findings show that fifty-three percent of the transactions provided specific titles in their answers1.

    2. Multiple citations.

    Previous research2-4 has focused on the context of the service rather than the actual sources used.

    3. Second use of a citation number used earlier

    Other studies have also looked at the types of questions asked3,5.

    Remember, the reference page would be numbered in the order that the citations were listed in the text. The citations may not be in alphabetical order.

    All authors cited in the text of your paper must appear in your reference list.
    If you have any further questions, please consult a Reference Librarian.

    updated 2/2/2010