• Faculty and Staff

    Chigbu-People

    Faculty

    LMRCSC Faculty

    Paulinus Chigbu

    Paulinus Chigbu, Ph.D. (University of Maryland Eastern Shore)
    Professor of Fisheries Science and LMRCSC Director

    Bio: Dr. Chigbu has been Director of the LMRCSC since 2006. He received his B.S. (Honors) and M.S. degrees in Zoology (concentration in Hydrobiology) from the University of Benin, Nigeria and his Ph.D from the University of Washington School of Fisheries. Since coming to UMES, he has established numerous programs for research and education in the marine sciences which he also directs, including the NSF CREST Center for the Integrated Study of Coastal Ecosystem Processes and Dynamics in the Mid-Atlantic Region (CREST-CISCEP) and a NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates site in Marine and Estuarine Science. He is also Director of the NSF-funded Professional Science Masters program in Quantitative Fisheries and Resource Economics at UMES.  Dr. Chigbu's primary research interests are: fisheries and zooplankton ecology,  particularly the influence of variations in climatic factors on water quality and biota, and trophic dynamics in marine and freshwater environments.
    Curriculum Vitae


    Bradley StevensBradley Stevens, Ph.D. (University of Maryland Eastern Shore)
    Professor and LMRCSC Distinguished Research Scientist
    Bio:
    Dr. Bradley Stevens received his Ph.D in Fisheries Science from the University of Washington School of Fisheries in 1982.  His research interests are the ecology and early life history of crustaceans and molluscs, with an emphasis on reproductive biology, postlarval settlement, growth, and feeding.  He uses a variety of tools including histology and image analysis to measure growth of eggs, larvae, and juveniles.  He has experience in aquaculture and stock enhancement of crustaceans, including king crabs and lobsters.  He also specializes in sampling methods to estimate abundance of marine populations, especially shellfish (crabs, mollusks), and the impacts of fishing on their populations, particularly bycatch, discard mortality, and impacts of derelict fishing gear. He often uses in-situ technology for this work, including submersibles and ROV's, and built six video camera sleds for undersea research.  He led two cruises to explore Gulf of Alaska seamounts with the submersible Alvin in 1999 and 2002.  In 2003-04 he discovered and surveyed the wreck of the Russian Barque Kad'yak (1860), the only shipwreck from the Russian Colonial Period and the oldest known wreck site in Alaska.

    Website

    Dionne HoskinsDionne Hoskins, Ph.D. (Savannah State University)
    Associate Professor and LMRCSC Project Director, SSU
    Bio:
     Dr. Dionne Hoskins received her B.S. degree in Marine Biology from Savannah State College in 1992 and her doctorate in Marine Sciences from the University of South Carolina in 1999. She worked briefly as a postdoctoral fellow in the newly established Marine, Environmental Science, and Biotechnology Research Center at SSU in 1999 but was tasked in 2000 by the Southeast Fisheries Science Center (SEFSC) of NOAA Fisheries to develop a Cooperative Marine Education and Research (CMER) program at the university, the first of its kind at a Historically Black University. Since then, she has worked as a Fishery Biologist through the Galveston Laboratory of NOAA Fisheries and as an Associate Graduate Professor in the Marine Science program at SSU. Dr. Hoskins is based in Savannah and works with undergraduate and graduate students on a variety of ecological research topics. As a benthic ecologist, her research interests revolve around the ecology of deposit feeding organisms in marine sediments. However, recent projects have examined the recovery of a transplanted marsh, the effects of fishing and disease on blue crab populations, and seasonal fluctuations of macrofaunal and microbial communities in shallow sediments. Dr. Hoskins also hosts high school students in her lab, one of whom is working on socioeconomic project trying to document the historical role of African-Americans in the coastal economy of Georgia. She teaches graduate courses in benthic ecology and advanced environmetrics. 
    Website


    Beth-BabcockElizabeth Babcock, Ph.D. (University of Miami RSMAS)
    Associate Professor, Marine Biology and Fisheries and LMRCSC Project Co-Director
    Bio:
    Dr. Beth Babcock is a fisheries biologist with a Ph.D. from the University of Washington, School of Fisheries whose dissertation research focused on the Oregon trawl fishery.  She spent five years at the Wildlife Conservation Society in New York, conducting scientific analyses in support of conservation efforts for tuna, swordfish, marlins and sharks.  Since 2003, she has been on the faculty of the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School. Her research focuses on analyzing fisheries data to determine how to make fisheries more sustainable, particularly for vulnerable species like sharks. She uses and teaches Bayesian statistical methods for fisheries stock assessment and decision analysis.  She focuses on species and fisheries for which conventional fisheries data are lacking, and, with limited data, has developed methods to determine what levels of fishing are sustainable. For example she has used monitoring data from inside and around marine protected areas to determine whether fish populations are overexploited.  She is also a collaborator on a 12 year field research project studying abundance, and movement behavior of sharks at Glover's Reef atoll, Belize.
    Website

     


    Daniel-BenettiDaniel Benetti, Ph.D. (University of Miami RSMAS)
    Professor, Marine Biology and Fisheries
    Bio:
    Dr. Daniel Benetti is a Professor and the Director of Aquaculture at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, where he was the Chairman of the Division of Marine Affairs and Policy from 2003 to 2008. He has over 30 years experience in aquaculture worldwide. Besides his academic responsibilities at RSMAS - where he teaches the 3 graduate level core courses of the Aquaculture Track degree - he carries out scientific and R&D projects on technology development and environmental issues related to aquaculture. He specializes in hatchery and open ocean growout technologies of marine finfish species, including, most recently, cobia, Seriola (yellowtail jacks), snapper, tuna, mahimahi and flounder. He has published over 100 articles in aquaculture science and technology, has extensive experience with the industry and has been a consultant for the private and government sectors in Latin America, U.S., Europe, Asia, Caribbean and Australia, where he has partnered with the government and the industry to spearhead advanced technology for hatchery and sustainable offshore aquaculture development. He is the scientific coordinator of several offshore aquaculture projects and operations in the US and abroad. He is a consultant for technology transfer of marine fish hatchery and growout for the government and private sector in a number of countries on 5 continents and conducts project development for sustainable aquaculture and environmental monitoring programs with focus on open ocean and coastal mariculture operations. His work is centered on innovative research to ensure that seafood production through mariculture is wholesome, environmentally sustainable and economically viable. 
    Website

     

    Feng-ChenFeng Chen, Ph.D. (University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science)
    Associate Professor, Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology
    Bio:
    Dr. Chen received his Ph.D. in Marine Microbial Ecology in 1995 from the University of Texas at Austin. He has published more than 60 scientific papers and book chapters, covering both basic and applied aspects of marine microbiology and microbial ecology. Using a variety of molecular tools, his laboratory investigates community structure and population dynamics of marine microorganisms in the aquatic environment like Chesapeake Bay. 
    Website



    JSook-ChungJ. Sook Chung, Ph.D. (University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science)
    Associate Professor, Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology
    Bio:
    Dr. Chung received her Ph.D. in Entomology in 1991 from Texas A&M University.  She has studied the mechanisms by which the endocrine system regulates growth, development and reproduction in decapod crustaceans using molecular biological approaches.  Her work has given definition to the crustacean CHH/VIH/MIH family of hormones.  Dr. Chung's work on endocrine triggers for shedding in the soft shell industry has implications for the management and bioeconomics of blue crab fisheries in the Chesapeake Bay.  Recently, Dr. Chung has initiated a study of the effects of the Gulf Oil spill on reproduction of grass shrimp and blue crab. 
    Website

    Tara-CoxTara Cox, Ph.D. (Savannah State University)
    Assistant Professor, Marine Science
    Bio:
    Dr. Tara Cox is an Assistant Professor in the Marine Science Program at Savannah State University with a focus on conservation biology and ecology of large marine vertebrates.  Cox began her career in marine science studying dolphin behavior in Baja California.  She then received a Master's in Coastal Environmental Management and Ph.D. in Ecology from Duke University.  She gained policy experience as the Assistant Scientific Program Director at the U.S. Marine Mammal Commission in Bethesda, Maryland.  She also taught at Pfeiffer University and conducted post-doctoral research at Duke University's Center for Marine Conservation.  Her research has always centered on ecological research that has direct applications to conservation of long-lived marine vertebrates.  Specifically, her dissertation research focused on harbor porpoises in the Gulf of Maine and her post-doctoral work involved collaborating with global researchers on assessing bycatch of marine mammals, sea turtles, and seabirds.   More recently, her graduate students are conducting research in such diverse areas as the policy of oyster reef restorations and foraging ecology of bottlenose dolphins.  
    Website


    Ben-CukerBenjamin Cuker, Ph.D. (Hampton University)
    Professor, Marine and Environmental Science
    Bio:
    Dr. Cuker is a graduate of the University of Michigan where he received a BS in Natural Resources, and a MS in Resource Ecology. He received his PhD from North Carolina State University in Zoology with a minor in Ecology.  He created the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) Multicultural Program, Multicultural Students at Sea Together (MAST), and the Hall-Bonner Program for Minority Doctoral Scholars in the Oceans Sciences.  His current research includes limnology of turbid lakes, estuarine ecology and hypoxia.  Dr. Cuker is the faculty advisor to the Hampton University sailing team. 
    Website 

    Carla-CurranCarla Curran, Ph.D. (Savannah State University)
    Associate Professor, Marine Science
    Bio:
    Dr. Mary Carla Curran is an Associate Professor in the Marine Science Program at Savannah State University whose area of expertise is in fish biology and marsh ecology. However, her interests span these areas as well as those involving the impact of human activities (particularly construction and contaminants) on estuaries, invertebrates, and marine education. Curran began her undergraduate training in the Marine Science program at University of South Carolina where she graduated Magna Cum Laude. She then earned a B.S. Honors degree in Zoology as a Fulbright Scholar at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. Her doctoral work in Biological Oceanography was completed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. She has held two postdoctoral positions, one at Rutgers University with Dr. Kenneth W. Able and another supported by the National Science Foundation and NATO at the Stazione Zoologica di Napoli in Italy with Dr. Flegrea Bentivegna. Before joining the faculty at SSU, Dr. Curran taught as an Assistant Professor at the University of South Carolina at Beaufort. Her current projects are focused mainly in estuarine habitats in coastal Georgia and South Carolina and include the use of estuaries by flatfishes, behavior and movement patterns of blackcheek tonguefish and contaminant loading in flounder in coastal Georgia. Her graduate students have conducted research related to her primary interest in flatfish ecology, but also a wide-array of other topics: prevalence of parasitism and behavioral changes associated with isopod parasites on grass shrimp, the effect of ray feeding pits on meiofauna, life history of cobia, bycatch in crab traps, and designing K-12 activities related to marsh ecology. She is actively involved in the Southeastern Estuarine Research Society (1998-present) as Coordinator of Student Travel Awards and is also a member of ASLO (2004-present), SETAC (2003-present), and the Estuarine Research Federation (2001-present). 
    Website 

    Maurice CrawfordMaurice Crawford, Ph.D. (University of Maryland Eastern Shore)
    Associate Professor
    Bio:
    Maurice Crawford began his career as a Fish Ecologist studying the age and growth of fishes with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, MA. Dr. Crawford holds a B.S. in Biology from the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth. He received his Master's degree in Ecology from Rutgers University where he studied the population genetics of weakfish. He also worked at the University of Georgia investigating factors regulating the organization of stream fish assemblages. 
    Dr. Crawford received his Ph.D. from North Carolina State University where he examined the effects of seagrass spatial heterogeneity on fishes. He was awarded a post-doctoral fellowship with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). As an AAAS Science and Diplomacy Fellow he worked with the US Agency for International Development (USAID) providing technical assistance on USAID's Climate Change Initiative. He currently is an Associate Professor at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore where he also serves as the Deputy Director of the Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center. His research interests include estuarine habitat conservation/restoration; the dispersal and movement of organisms; and the interplay between science and policy.
    Curriculum Vitae

    David-DieDavid Die, Ph.D. (University of Miami RSMAS)
    Associate Professor and LMRCSC Project Co-Director, RSMAS
    Bio:
    Dr. David Die received a B.S. in Zoology from the Universidad de La Laguna in Spain and a Ph.D. in Marine Living Resources from the University of Miami. He develops mathematical and statistical models (both for prediction and estimation) to support assessment of fishery resources and quantitative evaluation of the performance of natural resource management. He specializes in developing an understanding of the mechanisms that are key to the sustainability of fisheries. He has researched fisheries worldwide (Oceania, Asia, Latin America and Africa) and some of his research has been instrumental in the development of major management changes (fishing closures, fleet capacity reductions) in several fisheries. Presently, he is focusing on the assessment of tuna, billfish and reef-fish fisheries in the Atlantic. He has current collaborative research links with scientists in fishery Institutions all around the world. He is the Associate Director of the Cooperative Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Miami, and a Technical Coordinator for the Center for Independent Experts, one of the main vehicles used by NMFS to oversee the quality of its science.  
    Website 


    Deidre-GibsonDeidre Gibson, Ph.D. (Hampton University)
    Associate Professor and Chair, Marine and Environmental Science and LMRCSC Project Director, HU
    Bio:
    Dr. Deidre Gibson is the Chair of the Department of Marine and Environmental Science at Hampton University. She earned her B.S. in Oceanography from the University of Washington, and her Ph.D. in Marine Science from the University of Georgia/Skidaway Institute of Oceanography. She is a broadly-trained biological oceanographer with research interests centered on the trophic ecology, reproductive biology, and population dynamics of gelatinous zooplankton. Her research utilizes multidisciplinary and comparative approaches that integrate laboratory, field, and specimen-based techniques, using microscopy, molecular, and husbandry tools to provide insights into relationships between form, function, and the environment. Dr. Gibson is the Director of numerous grants and funded Diversity programs, including the LMRCSC, DREAMS I & II and two Centers for Ocean Science Education Excellence (COSEE). Dr. Gibson currently serves as a member-at-large, and ex-officio chair/member of the Diversity Committee on the Board of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO); she is the first African American scientist to ever serve on the board of this prestigious organization. 
    Website



    Patricia-GosleePatricia Goslee, Ed.D. (University of Maryland Eastern Shore) 
    Assistant Professor, Education Lead for the CREST-Center for the Integrated Study of Coastal Ecosystem Processes and Dynamics in the Mid-Atlantic Region
    Bio:
    Dr. Patricia Goslee joined the University Of Maryland Eastern Shore Department of Education as a lecturer in August, 2008. Dr. Goslee was appointed the Education Lead for the Living Marine Resource Cooperative Science Center in August, 2012. Since then, she has assisted with the implementation of two grant funded summer programs for high school students and teachers. The Student Experiential Enrichment Learning Program (SEEL) is designed for high school students and gives participants an opportunity to work closely with science professors in the Department of Natural Science on a specific research project. The Coastal Marine Science Teacher Workshop (CMARS) is a professional development opportunity for teachers, exposing them to cutting edge research on the Coastal Bays. As the Education Lead, Dr. Goslee shares program information with professional development partner schools in attempt to spark students' interest in science. Dr. Goslee's research interests are centered on molding future teachers across the various disciplines to connect content to hands-on experiences in order to enhance comprehension. She earned a B.S. in Rehabilitation Services in May, 1995 and a M.Ed. in Special Education from Wilmington University in January 2000, and an Ed.D. in Education from Wilmington University in May 2009.
    Curriculum Vitae  

    R-HillRussell Hill, Ph.D. (University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science)
    Professor and Director, Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology
    Bio:
    Dr. Russell Hill earned his Ph.D. in Microbiology from the University of Cape Town, South Africa.  His research focuses on the investigation of symbiotic bacteria associated with marine invertebrates, in particular, sponges.  A recent interest of Dr. Hill's laboratory is the production of biofuels and other useful compounds by marine microalgae, specifically, the role of symbiotic bacteria that improve the growth and stability of microalgal cultures.  Dr. Hill is a Fellow of the Society for Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology. He advises five graduate students in the MEES Program and was the recipient of the 2009 MEES Graduate Student Award, selected by vote of the MEES graduate students.   
    Website


    Chris-HintzChris Hintz, Ph.D. (Savannah State University)
    Assistant Professor, Marine Science
    Bio:
    Dr. Christopher Hintz is an assistant professor in the Marine Science Program at Savannah State University coordinating the development of SSU's Aquarium Certificate Program.  He graduated from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology with a B.S. in Chemical Engineering and continued at RHIT to receive his M.S. in Chemical Engineering (Environmental Engineering Minor) in 1998.  Dr. Hintz' master's research focused on a biological filtration technology which used algae cultures to remediate polluted aquatic systems.  During his doctoral research at the University of South Carolina and later in his post-doctoral position within the same laboratory at USC, Dr. Hintz developed specialized culture techniques to replicate deep-sea environments.  These techniques were used for culturing benthic foraminifera to investigate environmental and biological effects on their calcareous biomineralization mechanisms.  Most recently, he developed a state-of-the-art CO2 control system to replicate pre-industrial revolution or near future dissolved CO2 concentrations for long-term (6-12 month) laboratory culture systems.  With this controlled-culture technology, Dr. Hintz plans to investigate the biogeochemical influences of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and ocean acidification on phytoplankton calcifiers and potential changes in the inorganic carbon cycle.  Hintz specializes in environmental chemical analysis, technique development, filtration, and remediation.  
    Website 

    Andrij-HorodyskyAndrij Horodysky, Ph.D. (Hampton University)
    Assistant Research Professor, Marine and Environmental Science
    Bio:
    Dr. Andrij Horodysky received his BS from Eckerd College and his MS and PhD from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary. Dr. Horodysky is a broadly-trained organismal fisheries ecologist with research interests centered on behavior, ecophysiology, and conservation. His research applies multidisciplinary and comparative approaches that integrate laboratory, field, and specimen-based techniques to provide mechanistic insights into the relationships between form, function, and the environment. Dr. Horodysky's research interests manifest in both basic and applied contexts, with an emphasis on identifying mechanisms through which climate change and anthropogenic alterations of habitats affect organisms. 
    Website

    Ali-IshaqueAli Ishaque, Ph.D. (University of Maryland Eastern Shore)
    Professor, Environmental Toxicology
    Bio:
    Dr. Ishaque's research interests are: identifying molecular biomarkers for contaminant exposure and the effects of mixtures of chemical stressors (non-essential metals and stable xenobiotics) on ecosystems. He holds a Ph.D in Ecotoxicology and a M.S. degree in Marine Ecology from the Free University of Brussels, Belgium and a B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Science and Technology, Ghana. 
    Curriculum Vitae


    Rosemary-JagusRosemary Jagus, Ph.D. (UMCES Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology)
    Professor and LMRCSC Project Director, UMCES IMET
    Bio:
    Dr. Jagus received her Ph.D. in Biochemistry from University College London in 1976.  She studies the regulation of protein synthesis in eukaryotic organisms from protists to zebrafish.  She is working currently on the role of phosphorylation of the translational initiation factor eIF2 in the adaptation of fish to different diets, changing temperatures, and viral infection.  In addition, Dr. Jagus is studying the translational regulation of gene expression in toxic dinoflagellates, as well as the diversity of the translational machinery in protists. Dr. Jagus is also coordinator of the LMRCSC summer internship program at UMCES IMET.  
    Website


    Diego-LirmanDiego Lirman, Ph.D. (University of Miami RSMAS)
    Associate Professor, Marine Biology and Fisheries
    Bio:
    Diego Lirman is an Associate Professor in the Marine Biology and Fisheries Division of the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. His research emphasis is on the disturbance ecology and resilience of coastal ecosystems and communities. Over the past 19 years, Dr. Lirman has worked on diverse projects to: (1) evaluate the health of seagrasses, macroalgae, and coral reef communities; (2) estimate the impacts of multiple human and natural stressors on these susceptible natural resources; (3) predict the potential impacts of future disturbances on these systems; (4) discern physiological mechanisms that enhance ecosystem resilience; and (5) develop novel survey and monitoring tools. More recently, his research has expanded onto the field of restoration ecology where he has concentrated on the biological restoration of threatened coral species and reef habitats. He is presently the scientific leader of a regional reef restoration program centered in the Caribbean, with active restoration projects in the Dominican Republic and Honduras. His research approach combines field monitoring, laboratory experiments, and ecological modeling to document present-day condition of critical ecosystem attributes and develop simulation scenarios to forecast the potential impacts of human and natural disturbances on ecosystem resilience.  
    Website  

    Eric-MayEric May, Ph.D. (University of Maryland Eastern Shore)
    Professor, Fish Biology and Pathology
    Bio:
    Dr. May's research interests are the use of biochemical and metabolic indicators to determine the response of fish to injurious agents or conditions, establishment of clinical methods as a means of non-lethal testing of wild and cultured stocks, the effects of environmental damage on resident aquatic organisms and application of fish health management approaches for use in aquaculture and wild stocks. Dr. May received his Ph.D from Oregon State University in Biochemistry, Pathology and Microbiology. He also completed his B.S. in Zoology at OSU, with a minor in fisheries. His M.S. from Northern Arizona University was in Cell Biology and Parasitology. 
    Website

    Dennis-McIntoshDennis McIntosh Ph.D. (Delaware State University)
    Associate Research Professor & Extension Specialist - Aquaculture
    Bio:
    Throughout his professional career, Dr. McIntosh has endeavored to reduce aquaculture's impact on the environment, believing that a thriving aquaculture industry depends upon our resolve to create the smallest environmental footprint possible.  Specifically, his goals are to continue to strengthen and support the aquaculture industry by conducting applied aquaculture research and to share this new information with producers to enhance the industry and its products.  Beyond assisting producers, Dennis feels it is important to educate and train students about the theories, concepts, and procedures of aquaculture, because today's aquaculture students are tomorrow's aquaculture producers and consumers. 
    Curriculum Vitae 

    Jessica-MillerJessica Miller, Ph.D. (Oregon State University)
    Associate Professor and LMRCSC Project Director, OSU
    Bio:
    Dr. Miller is an Associate Professor at Oregon State University in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife and is a member of the Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station. She has over 15 years of experience in the early life history of marine and anadromous fishes. Her research combines various methodologies, including otolith chemical and structural, genetic, and time-series analyses, to provide novel information on the life histories of fishes. Her current research projects are focused on identifying mechanisms regulating early ocean survival in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and examining larval source contribution and patterns of dispersal in Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus). 
    Website 



    G-OzbayGulnihal Ozbay, Ph.D. (Delaware State University)
    Research Professor, Natural Resources
    Bio:
    Dr. Ozbay's research and outreach education programs focus on habitat restoration via oyster revitalization and restoration in critical estuaries in Delaware's Bays. Her research identifies environmental stressors and relationships between water quality and naturally occurring bacteria that could be potentially harmful to either aquatic species or humans. In addition, she studies cellular response and population structures of several harmful algal species in Delaware waters as a result of changes in temperature, carbon dioxide, nutrients, and other changes associated with climate change phenomena. For her outreach goals, she plans to offer drinking water quality clinics and public seminars to discuss potential issues with private wells and potential water treatments and expand community outreach oyster gardening program for habitat restoration. In an attempt to enhance the oyster populations and improve water quality conditions in Delaware, the Center for Inland Bays, the Delaware Sea Grant Marine Advisory Program, and Delaware State University have been collaborating on an oyster gardening restoration program. A variety of culturing techniques, including subtidal modified rack and bag aquaculture, oyster cages, Taylor floats, and created oyster reefs, have been used to investigate ecological and biological impacts of these efforts. She is looking at population structure and spat recruitment in and around oyster beds in Delaware Bay and rip-rap planting of rocks along the canals and oyster gardening program driven by the residents of Sussex County in Delaware.  
    Curriculum Vitae  

    Salina-ParveenSalina Parveen, Ph.D. (University of Maryland Eastern Shore)
    Professor, Food and Environmental Microbiology; Seafood Safety
    Bio:
    Dr. Parveen holds a B.S. in Botany and an M.S. in Microbiology from the University of Dhaka, Bangladesh and a Ph.D. in Food Science and Human Nutrition, specializing in Microbiology and Molecular Biology from the University of Florida, FL. She teaches graduate level courses in Microbiology and Toxicology. Her research interests are Food and Environmental Microbiology, Food Safety, and Water Quality. Dr. Parveen has received several awards including Chancellor Award, Govt. of Bangladesh, and Book Award, Dhaka University, for securing first class position in B.S, Dhaka University merit scholarship for outstanding achievement in undergraduate and graduate studies, and outstanding new faculty award, School of Agricultural and Natural Sciences, UMES. In addition, she served as an invited review panelist for NOAA/UNH, USDA and Water quality and Health Bureau, Health Canada. Furthermore, she serves on the editorial board of the peer-reviewed journal, Infection and Drug Resistance.  Currently, she is serving as major advisor of six doctoral and two masters' students and one research specialist. Dr. Parveen's students have received several awards and scholarships for their outstanding academic performance.

    Curriculum Vitae   


    Joseph-PitulaJoseph Pitula, Ph.D. (University of Maryland Eastern Shore)
    Associate Professor, Parasitology, Molecular Biology
    Bio:
    Dr. Pitula's research interests focus on disease-causing protozoan parasites. His current projects are devoted to studying marine parasites of both blue crabs and oysters, two vital food resources essential to the economic health of the Chesapeake Bay region. These projects aim to 1) develop diagnostic methods to understand disease transmission 2) understand ecological considerations of parasite life cycles and communities, and 3) study the basic biochemical and genetic pathways functioning in both host and parasite. In addition, his laboratory studies Leishmania sp., a protozoan parasite of animals, using a lizard parasite species, Leishmania tarentolae, as a model for the human pathogen. In humans, Leishmaniasis is the second most deadly parasitic protozoan disease, second only to malaria.  Dr. Pitula's research seeks to identify and characterize: 1) a Leishmania sp. enzyme that participates in generating sugars during parasitism of host immune cells and 2) pathways leading to the production of ribosomes in these organisms. Understanding biochemical and genetic mechanisms essential to parasite survival are theorized to assist in rational drug design approaches, so as to combat human disease. 
    Website 

    Allen-PlaceAllen R. Place, Ph.D. (University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science)
    Professor, Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology
    Bio:
    Dr. Place received his Ph.D in Biochemistry from Johns Hopkins University in 1979.  He studies the molecular mechanisms that permit organisms to adapt to unique diets, environments, and interactions (symbiosis).  He has developed plant based diets for cobia and other fish. He has developed sophisticated technologies to identify and monitor distinct populations of blue crabs, monkfish and striped bass using genetic markers.  He identified the dinoflagellate Karlodinium veneficum as the toxin producing organism responsible for fish kills in the Chesapeake Bay.  Dr Place has identified the toxin responsible, and works with state agencies to make accurate assessments of algal species and toxins crucial to an understanding of human health risks.  His work on the unusual genomes of dinoflagellates is expanding our understanding of harmful algal blooms and their production of toxins.  
    Website  

    Dave-SampsonDavid Sampson, Ph.D. (Oregon State University)
    Professor, Fisheries
    Bio:
    Dr. Sampson's research focuses on two main topics: (1) improving stock assessments so they provide more accurate estimates and (2) development of bio-economic models to better understand and predict the dynamics of fishery systems (fish stocks plus fishing fleets). There are inherent uncertainties in the stock assessment estimates that underpin the annual catch quotas on which management usually relies.  The best way to reduce this uncertainty remains unclear however.  Imprecise data, incorrect relative emphasis of different data sources, and incorrect specifications of underlying model structure all contribute to the uncertainty.  Dr. Sampson applies stock assessment techniques to simulated data sets, generated to have known properties, and compares the assessment estimates with the known true values, thereby quantifying stock assessment errors and the relative contributions of different sources.  This method provides an objective basis for evaluating the potential of different approaches to improve stock assessments.  With regard to bio-economic modeling, there is a general need to evaluate the biological and economic performance of different kinds of fishery harvest control rules and management plans.  Many of the current approaches for conducting so-called management strategy evaluations make unrealistic assumptions about the reactions of fishers to changing conditions (e.g., that fishing mortality and catches follow prescribed rules).  Dr. Sampson is developing more realistic methods for modeling the behavior of fishermen, particularly with regard to the fishers' choice of fishing locations, the mix of species that they harvest, and the types of gear they deploy. 
    Website

     

    Eric-SchottEric Schott, Ph.D. (University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science)
    Assistant Professor, Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology
    Bio:
    Dr. Schott earned a B.A. at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and a Ph.D. in genetics at Harvard Medical School in Boston.  His interests and expertise include the discovery and study of marine pathogens and the health and disease of aquatic invertebrates, particularly the eastern oyster and blue crab. Diseases may play a significant role in shaping populations of marine species, but assessing the prevalence and effects of disease in wild populations of aquatic species has been historically difficult.  Molecular and biotechnological tools now make it more feasible to ask what roles specific diseases have on populations of fish, shellfish and crustaceans.  Dr. Schott's students are currently using genome-targeted methods to study the dynamics of protozoan and viral pathogens of crabs in the context of climate change and the fishing industry, and investigating the effects of toxic algae on the immune system of blue crab.  Dr. Schott serves on the MD Oyster Advisory Commission and participates in state legislative testimony related to Chesapeake Bay issues.  He collaborates with scientists at several NOAA offices, as well as with state resource managers in MD, DE, FL and MA.  
    Website 



    Margaret-Sexton-2Margaret Sexton, Ph.D. (University of Maryland Eastern Shore)
    Research Assistant Professor of Marine Biology
    Bio:
    Dr. Maggie Sexton received a B.S. degree in Marine Science and Biology from Coastal Carolina University in 2003 and a Ph.D. in Marine, Estuarine, and Environmental Science from the University of Maryland in 2012. Her dissertation research,  conducted at the Horn Point Laboratory, sought to characterize inter-annual and intra-annual variability in the abundance of the sea nettle Chrysaora quinquecirrha in Chesapeake Bay and the environmental conditions that cause this variability.  She joined  the LMRCSC in 2013.  Her current research interests include the biology and ecology of gelatinous zooplankton in the Chesapeake Bay and Maryland Coastal Bays, particularly the early life stages of C. quinquecirrha.  
    Curriculum Vitae


    Stacy-SmithStacy Smith, Ph.D. (Delaware State University)
    Senior Research Scientist and LMRCSC Project Director, DSU
    Bio:
    Dr. Stacy Smith is a chemical oceanographer/chemist. She received her B.A. from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), her M.S. from University of New Mexico and her Ph.D. from University of Alaska Fairbanks. Her research focuses on the impacts of human activities on estuaries, the coastal and marine environments and their living marine resources.  Coastal areas are vulnerable to environmental factors such as encroaching development, sea level rise, dredging and dredge spoil, pollution and nutrient loading. These stressors can dramatically degrade water quality, cause eutrophication, increase turbidity and hypoxia/anoxia, thereby decreasing available essential fish habitat. Dr. Smith's current projects address the impact of ocean acidification on fish otolith growth and fish behavior. She is also investigating nutrient loading and climate change effects on estuaries through monitoring of nutrient levels, pH, alkalinity, and dissolved inorganic and organic carbon.  The role PCBs and chemical contaminants play in Delaware Bay fish and shellfish health is also of interest to her.

    Gil-SylviaGil Sylvia, Ph.D. (Oregon State University)
    Associate Professor, Fisheries and Wildlife
    Bio:
    Dr. Sylvia's research program focuses on bio-economics and seafood marketing research that contributes to improved marine resource, fishery, and aqua cultural management and policy. The bio-economic work integrates the biological and ecological dynamics of west coast, national, and international fisheries (e.g., groundfish, salmon, crab, tuna) under alternative institutions to improve approaches for achieving multi-objective management approaches. Aquaculture research focuses on integrated bio-economic models to improve production methods, manage externalities, determine site location, and optimize breeding strategies. Recent work in understanding ecosystem services associated with community-based marine protected areas uses integrated spatial models for linking ecosystems with economic objectives of marine spatial areas. Seafood marketing work evaluates the economic value of information systems for integrating harvest strategies, product quality, management, and marketing.  All research is highly interdisciplinary and provides significant opportunities for students to develop programs that integrate biology, ecology, economics, management, marketing, and food science. 
    Website

    Meng-XiaMeng Xia, Ph.D. (University of Maryland Eastern Shore)
    Associate Professor, Oceanography
    Bio:
    The addition of Dr. Meng Xia, who joined UMES in 2011, greatly strengthens the marine science expertise within the Department of Natural Sciences. A physical oceanographer by training, Dr. Xia received his Ph.D from North Carolina State University in 2007 and his M.S. degree from First Institute of Oceanography in China in 2002. Before coming to UMES, he served as Research Investigator in the Cooperative Institute of Limnology and Ecosystems Research at University of Michigan. Dr. Xia's research interests focus on estuarine and coastal dynamics, specifically river plume and estuary dynamics, larval transport processes, TMDL modeling, watershed modeling, wave current dynamics and sediment transport processes. 
    Curriculum Vitae
    Website

    Staff

    LMRCSC Staff

    Anne Dudley, Data, Information and Communications Manager
    Ph: (410) 651-6196
    Email: acdudley@umes.edu

    Ida Tilghman, Administrative Assistant
    Ph: (410) 651-7870 
    Email: imtilghman@umes.edu

    Onjalé Scott, Geosciences Programs Coordinator
    Ph: (410) 621-2270
    Email: obscott@umes.edu