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Miguel Martin

  • Miguel Martin, PhD
    Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences

    Education

    • Ph.D.- Physiology (2000) University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    • M.S.- Medicine (1995) Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Canada
    • B.S. (Honors)- Biophysics (1991) Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia

    Bio

    After completing his postdoctoral training at the University of Houston in 2003, Dr. Martin joined the faculty at the University of Vermont where he taught several undergraduate and graduate courses, including a capstone Physiology course and a Neurodevelopment course for Biology majors. At the University of Vermont, Dr. Martin mentored the research thesis of three PhD and one MSc student. He was also actively involved in undergraduate research. 

    Dr. Martin’s main research interest is in neurophysiology, particularly the role of ion channels in cell physiology. His research has focused on the function of voltage-gated calcium channels and calcium-permeable receptors during neuronal cell differentiation and cancer development. Using the chicken embryo as a model, he has studied the function of T-type calcium channels and calcium-permeable AMPA receptors during neuronal cell differentiation. He is currently investigating the functional implications of T-type calcium channel expression in prostate cancer development. Dr. Martin’s research has been supported by grants from the National Institute of Health and the Vermont Genetic Network. During his professional career, Dr. Martin has co-authored many scientific articles in neuroscience, physiology and neurodevelopment. He has conducted multiple presentations at national and international meetings. Dr. Martin is a member of the Society for Neuroscience, the American Physiological Society, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the American Association of College of Pharmacy.

    Courses Taught

    PHAR 511 Genetic Control of Cell Function
    PHAR 520 Principles of Neurobiology and Neuropharmacology
    PHAR 521 Cardiovascular and Renal Pharmacology and Med. Chemistry                            
    PHAR 522 Gastrointestinal and Genitourinary Pharmacology and Med. Chemistry
    PHAR 525 Neuropharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry


    Scholarly activities

    Zhang QJ, Hsia SC, Martin-Caraballo M (2017) Regulation of T-type Ca2+ channel expression by herpes simplex virus-1 infection in sensory-like ND7 cells. J. Neurovirol. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13365-017-0545-9

    Greer JJ, Martin-Caraballo M (2017) Developmental plasticity of phrenic motoneurons and diaphragm properties with the insertion of inspiratory drive transmission in uterus. Exp. Neurol. 287(Pt 2): 137-143.

    Weaver EM, Zamora FJ, Hearne JL, Martin-Caraballo M (2015) Posttranscriptional regulation of T-type Ca2+ channel expression by interleukin-6 in prostate cancer cells. Cytokine 76(2): 309-320.

    Weaver EM, Zamora FJ, Puplampu-Dove YA, Kiessu E, Hearne JL, Martin-Caraballo M (2015) Regulation of T-type calcium channel expression by sodium butyrate in prostate cancer cells. Eur J Pharmacol. 749: 20-31.

    Yoon YJ, White SL, Ni X, Gokin AP, Martin-Caraballo M (2012) Downregulation of GluA2 AMPA receptor subunits reduced the dendritic arborization of developing spinal motoneurons. PLoS ONE 7(11): e49879. http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0049879

    Ni X, Martin-Caraballo M (2010) Differential effect of glutamate receptor activation on the maturation of dendritic morphology in lumbar motoneurons. Neuropharmacol. 58: 593-604.

    Click here for the list of articles on https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=martin-caraballo

    Areas of Interest and/or Experience

    • Ion channel physiology
    • Regulation of ion channel expression in prostate cancer
    • Regulation of intracellular calcium by calcium channels

    Current Research Activities

    Role of T-type calcium channels in the progression of prostate cancer

    Regulation of T-type calcium channel expression by herpes virus infection